skip to Main Content

Canine Vaccinations

Bordetella

Bordetella is also one of the three most common causes of Canine Upper Respiratory Disease Complex, known as “Kennel Cough.” Symptoms include a harsh, dry cough, aggravated by activity or excitement. The cough is followed by retching or gagging in an attempt to clear small amounts of mucous from the throat. Body temperatures may be elevated as secondary bacterial infection takes place. Pnuemonia can result from this infection and it is highly contagious. Vaccination is recommended for all dogs that encounter at least one other dog routinely. This would include dogs that go on walks around the neighborhood, go to dog parks or get boarded sometimes. This vaccination is recommended every 6 months.

Canine Distemper

Canine Distemper (CD) is caused by a virus closely related to the human measle virus. It is considered the most serious viral disease of dogs in the world. Approximately 50% of nonvaccinated, nonimmunized dogs infected with CD virus develop clinical signs of the disease and approximately 90% of those dogs infected with CD die. All the bodily secretions of an infected animal contain the virus, it is highly contagious, and it is primarily spread by an airborne route. Early clinical signs include anorexia, diarrhea, and dehydration. As the disease progresses, fever, depression, vomiting, and bloody diarrhea may be observed accompanied by signs of respiratory distress. Coughing, labored breathing, inflammation of tissues around the eyes and nose and a severe nasal discharge may occur. If dogs recover from Distemper they often have lifelong complications. All dogs should be vaccinated against Canine Distemper Virus beginning at 7-8 weeks of age and continuing every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age, and then annually or every 3 years thereafter depending on life style.

Hepatitis (Adenovirus Type 2 )

This virus causes hepatitis or liver disease in dogs that can be quite serious and can be fatal. Aggressive therapy is needed for recovery, and dogs that survive this virus can have lifelong liver complications. All dogs should be vaccinated beginning at 7-8 weeks of age and continuing every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age, and then annually or every 3 years thereafter depending on lifestyle.

Leptospirosis

Leptospirosis is zoonotic, meaning that it is very contagious from dog to human. This is actually a bacterial disease, so the protective “vaccination” is actually a “bacterin” or anti-bacterial vaccine. Leptospirosis infection is asymptomatic, meaning that the infection can go unnoticed until end stages when liver and kidney failure have already set in. This disease can be fatal. Dogs contract the disease from contact with an infected animal, or their urine, which means that just about anywhere can be a source of the bacteria…grass, plants, dirt or contaminated water. Wild animals serve as reservoirs and excrete the bacteria in their urine and the bacteria is then viable for months on the contaminated surfaces. For this reason we highly recommend each dog be vaccinated for Leptospirosis beginning at 7-8 weeks of age and continuing every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age. Thereafter annual boosters will be recommended as this vaccine only lasts 1 year.

Parainfluenza

Parainfluenza is a highly contagious respiratory virus. Infected dogs typically develop upper respiratory signs and can develop pneumonia. All dogs should be vaccinated beginning at 7-8 weeks of age and continuing every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age, and then annually or every 3 years thereafter depending on lifestyle.

Parvovirus

Parvovirus is probably the most common viral illness of dogs at the present time. It is a common cause of severe bloody vomiting and diarrhea and severe dehydration in puppies.  After infection, the virus attacks the lining of the stomach and intestines and patients need aggressive fluid therapy and antibiotics to survive. This virus is often fatal. All dogs should be vaccinated beginning at 7-8 weeks of age and continuing every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age, and then annually or every 3 years thereafter depending on lifestyle.

Rabies

Rabies is a zoonotic (can be spread to humans) virus that is always 100% fatal. There is no treatment. It is easily transmitted from any warm blooded animal bite (saliva) that is infected. Vaccination is required by the state of NC. All dogs should be vaccinated at 16 weeks old, and then annually or every 3 years thereafter depending on which state you live in. Each state has their own Rabies requirements.

Feline Vaccinations

Calicivirus

This virus causes respiratory disease in its acute phase. It can become chronic. Affected cats may have persistent gum disease or chronically recurring upper respiratory disease and is highly contagious. This vaccination is recommended for all cats beginning at 7-8 weeks of age and continuing every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age, and then annually or every 3 years thereafter depending on lifestyle.

Chlamydiosis

This is a bacterial respiratory disease of cats. Cats that have this infection will have sneezing, watery eyes, breathing problems, coughing, anorexia and fever. All cats should be vaccinated beginning at 7-8 weeks of age and continuing every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age, and then annually or every 3 years thereafter depending on lifestyle.

Feline Leukemia

Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a fatal disease that can be spread easily from mother cat to kitten and also through contact with other cats harboring the disease. FeLV can cause a wide variety of problems ranging from weight loss, respiratory infections, diarrhea, vomiting, neurologic deficits and severe eye disease. Kittens that have the virus also are at increased risk for cancer later in life. Testing for the disease is recommended prior to vaccination and testing is typically done at the first kitten visit. If the kitten is negative, the vaccine is given beginning at 7-8 weeks of age and continued every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age, and then annually thereafter depending on lifestyle.

Panleukopenia (Distemper)

Panleukopenia is the cat disease most often referred to as “Distemper” in this species. It is a deadly disease that causes bloody diarrhea, severe dehydration, anemia and death. Contact with infected cats, or their food or water sources, or through contact with a human that has the virus on their clothing or shoes are common modes of transmission. Because this is a fatal disease, all cats should be vaccinated beginning at 7-8 weeks of age and continuing every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age, and then annually or every 3 years thereafter depending on lifestyle.

Rabies

Rabies is a fatal neurologic disease that is zoonotic (capable of spread to humans). (See dog vaccines). HBAH follows NC law recommendations of annual vaccination for cats.

Rhinotracheitis

Rhinotracheitis is caused by a herpes virus. It causes respiratory disease in its acute phase. Chronically, it can be the cause of persistent eye irritation and corneal disease (cloudiness or blood vessel infiltration in the clear part of the eye). Due to the potentially chronic nature of this disease,this vaccine is also recommended for all cats. All cats should be vaccinated beginning at 7-8 weeks of age and continuing every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age, and then annually or every 3 years thereafter depending on lifestyle.

AdobeStock_104844620_Preview

Testimonials

The whole experience was wonderful. Getting an appointment scheduled was easy, we were greeted and signed in with no hassles. A tech took our info and Molly was taken in for her procedure. When it was finished, the doctor called and talked to me and we arranged a time for pickup. When I arrived, I met with the doctor and was given review of her procedure and advise for her care for the next 24 hours. We checked out and drove home. Could not have been easier. The staff is wonderful - both caring and efficient.

Barbara Roche

I was very pleased with my first visit. Everyone was very professional and knowledgeable. Both the technicians and the Dr. took their time to get a full history. I really felt like they cared for my dog's health. I have been to other vets where I felt like I was being rushed so they could get to the next patient. This was definitely not the case. I would absolutely recommend Hemlock to anyone looking for a vet.

Jason Black

I love seeing a familiar face as soon as I open the door. I'd follow Justine and Jenny anywhere! Dr. Snyder solved Shelby's problems in a matter of minutes and I've been chasing answers for years. She's phenomenal! Melissa's knowledge and guidance has been beyond my expectations, and getting to know all of the Staff has kept a permanent smile on my face. I feel as if I've been on a long journey eager to establish roots. I'M HOME!

Nancy & Kevin Ziese

From the moment we discussed Sadie's surgery, to the follow-up the day prior, to the calls day of to go over options and 1:1 time with Dr D when we picked her up - it was all wonderful. Everyone seemed to truly care about her and also making sure we were comfortable. The surgery went better than expected and she's doing so well. We could not have imagined going anywhere else for her care.

Erica & Michael Ring

Greatest Pet Place on Earth!!! We have been clients at Hemlock Bluffs Animal Hospital for 5+ years and know the owners and staff quite well! Our pets are always treated with great love and attention, and we feel when we board our pets, they are receiving extraordinary care and staying at a home away from home! We love our vet and staff and highly recommend HBAH!!!

Pam & Chuck Pribble
Back To Top